Recent posts

This post is coauthored with Johanna Thoma and cross-posted at Choice & Inference. Accompanying Mathematica code is available on GitHub. Lara Buchak’s Risk & Rationality advertises REU theory as able to recover the modal preferences in the Allais paradox. In our commentary we challenged this claim. We pointed out that REU theory is strictly “grand-world”, and in the grand-world setting it actually struggles with the Allais preferences. To demonstrate, we constructed a grand-world model of the Allais problem.... Read more

One of my favourite probability puzzles to teach is a close cousin of the Monty Hall problem. Originally from a 1965 book by Frederick Mosteller,1 here’s my formulation: Three prisoners, A, B, and C, are condemned to die in the morning. But the king decides in the night to pardon one of them. He makes his choice at random and communicates it to the guard, who is sworn to secrecy.... Read more

In our last two posts we established two key facts: The set of possible probability assignments is convex. Convex sets are “obtuse”. Given a point outside a convex set, there’s a point inside that forms a right-or-obtuse angle with any third point in the set. Today we’re putting them together to get the central result of the accuracy framework, the Brier dominance theorem. We’ll show that a non-probabilistic credence assignment is always “Brier dominated” by some probabilistic one.... Read more

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I'm an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. I research uncertainty in human reasoning. I also indulge in some programming and related nerdery.